Ropewalk News

Heritage Book Fair – Saturday September 15

By richardhatfield |

A rare opportunity to acquire books from the personal library of one of area’s most noted local historians, Geoff Bryant, takes place on the penultimate day of Barton upon Humber’s Heritage Open Days.

The collection of general history books will be on sale as Mr Bryant has taken the decision to reduce the size of his personal collection that he has built up over more than five decades involved in local history particularly during his time as tutor organizer with the Workers’ Educational Association.

“The Heritage Book Fair will include a programme of talks by local authors and historians as well as heritage book stalls giving those with an interest in local history the chance to delve further into the town’s fascinating history in the company of other enthusiasts as well as building up a personal collection,” said Liz Bennet of The Ropewalk.

Mr Bryant begins the series of talks at 11am in the Humber Room when he will highlight books published about the heritage of Barton upon Humber and their importance. He will also discuss the merits of the publications and give his recommendations for the must reads.

Three quarters of an hour later bicycle enthusiast Nigel Land will talk about Elswick Hopper Cycles, the company that grew from a small whitesmith’s business in Brigg Road in 1880to become one of the largest bicycle factories in the country with the factory based on  Marsh Lane and run from a prestigious office building at the corner of Brigg Road and Market Place.

His first brand was Ajax, first marketed in 1890 and just 20 years later the assets of a prestigious Newcastle company – Elswick Cycles were acquired. Owner Fred Hopper experienced many ups and downs over the years, but finished up employing more than 600 people becoming Managing Director of the Elswick-Hopper Cycle and Motor Company Ltd.

In Nigel’s book, Elswick-Hopper of Barton-on-Humber, the full history of cycle manufacture in the town is recorded, including the early Falcon story and that of Nigel Dean Cycles. His talk will include many photographs of the business, many of which have not previously been shown.

At 12.30pm Richard Clarke, an adult education tutor and well-known speaker and tour guide, will be talking about housing in Barton and will be presenting ideas from his publication Housing in a North Lincolnshire Town, a comprehensive study of domestic architecture during 19th century Barton upon Humber.

The afternoon is given over to a talk by local historian Brian Peeps who, at 2pm, will be talking about Barton upon Humber shops and public houses

His illustrated talk will use images from his vast collection of historic Barton photographs and postcards that spans more than 100 years of the town’s history and this talk will concentrate on notable shops and public houses as they were and how they are today.

 

The fair runs 10am until 4pm along The Ropewalk’s corridors starting at the Artspace and stalls include, as well as general history books belonging to Mr Bryant, an Oxfam book shop collection of history and antiquarian books, Fathom Press local heritage books, and a large collection of art history books from The Ropewalk as well as the Wilderspin National School Museum.

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Noted: Lou Hazelwood & Sarah Pennington

Noted brings together artists Lou Hazelwood and Sarah Pennington for the first time, as they negotiate similar interests in the mechanisation of music and roles of women.

Hazelwood’s piece in progress ‘La Boheme/I’ve Got Her Disease Inside My Head’ transposes pianola scores to playable music boxes working with the oppositional themes of the female bohemian and hysteric.

Pennington has constructed a series of new sculptural observations and print works through a combination of historical research and material experimentation with player piano rolls and remnants of piano mechanisms.

This exhibition showcases the initial findings of their separate but related research into, and interventions with, the structures of pianos and pianolas, and social situations surrounding their key periods of use.

If you are interested in following these processes of exploration as they continue to unfold, please visit www.facebook.com/Noted

By richardhatfield |

Rachel Morley

Rachel Morley creates unique felt items by hand using the wet felt method. The natural colours and shapes of the Scottish coastal landscape have inspired the Pebble range or Doorstops, Cubby Bowls, Cubbyholes and Pebble Pods. Rachel experiments with wool fibres from British breeds of sheep to take advantage to their varying qualities. As a contrast, Rachel enjoys the challenges of felting with a broad colour palette to create the colourful range of bowls.

Rachel’s aim is to elevate felt craft to create innovate products for the interior, echoing organic forms of the coastal landscape. Her fine art background brings a very sculptural feel to her work which is tactile and evocative.

Rachel has a Fine Art Degree and Level 2 and Level 3 Diplomas in Feltmaking. She is a member of the international Feltmakers Association and Design Nation. She is a supporter of the campaign for Wool and member of the Rare Breeds Survival Trust. Rachel works from a studio in Hickling a village situated between Nottingham and Melton Mowbray. Come in to the Craft Gallery during the month of May and admire the Scottish bliss Rachel Morley felt pieces create.

By devonb |

Box Gallery

Spring Awakening

In the Box Gallery this month we have been inspired by the weather, and have put together a display celebrating spring. The focus is on the rebirth of nature, selecting pieces which represent the bloom of new flowers and joyous animals. The range of work within the exhibition is from a variety of makers working in different crafts all embodying our theme of spring.

Here is just a selection of the pieces we have on display in the Box Gallery.

 

By devonb |

Agitated Presence

Paul Collinson | Gary Saunt | Kat Saunt | Steve Upton

This exhibition shows work by a group of East Yorkshire and Hull based painters whose practice involves, either incidentally or wholly,  the used of photography or computer software.

This can be in the organisation of the idea, the capture and use images as subject matter, or in the very creation of the artwork itself.

What all the painters do have in common is that need, the “agitation”, to produce something that has a presence.

By richardhatfield |

Andrew Adair

Obviously my specialisation is in ceramics, but over the last 3-4 years I have diverged into 2D abstract and flitted back and forth between the two often combining techniques across both. A constant theme throughout has been the printed letter/text and the interplay between positive and negative space therein. The older letter bottles are relief printmaking in clay and from them blossomed the larger industrial 2D abstracts onto old metal shelves and disused wooden pallets. Another ever present has been my trusted blowtorch, which has enabled me to produce interesting surfaces and textures in the clay through forced drying and also letting me introduce dirt into the painted surface in the form of trapped carbon. It is important for me to be true to the material and allow it to be inherent in the final pieces.

Topics and style vary, from heavily textured, distorted pots, to letters bottles discussing elements of jazz, to political and social commentary and stuff about bikes? The large abstracts initially explored the rhythms between the letters but then began to migrate into the self-portrait in the form of big selfies and some of these themes then translated back into the pot form.

Throughout my career my work has cycled back to the same themes – surface and form – and these are essentially what this exhibition is about.

By richardhatfield |

MODJOOL

Customisable jewellery by Jackie Selcraig

Jackie Selcraig does not abide by the taught rules of creative design, for her it is very fluid and unstructured. Governed instead by play Jackie begins by siting down and experimenting with the composition of the bits and pieces she has collected over the years. Enjoying mixing colours, textures and materials, the aim is always to create something different, unique and unusual.

Modjool started with the Build Ring, since then, it has grown into a whole family of interactive jewellery, attracting fashion conscious customer eager to take advantage of the versatility of the range. Modjool is a system of statement jewellery, which features ranges which can be worn individually, mixed and matched or combined magnetically. The wearer can adapt the appearance by simply changing colour, shape, size, material or style all within the same jewellery collection.

Shape is bold, geometric, statement jewellery. The pendants can be magnetically attached to any of the colourful Click Range using a special bail.

Build is fun customisable jewellery. The silver ring and necklace base pieces can be transformed by adding a variety of colourful beads and stoppers. You can create a different look every day. Mix the colours up or choose a neutral palette for something more sophisticated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By devonb |