Monthly Archives: April 2018

George Hainsworth

By richardhatfield |

“These are works which in the main have made in the last three years when my wife and I relocated to East Yorkshire to live.

The themes of The Sea, Bridges and Ships have for a long time been subjects in my work, though they may well have been given point and inspiration from our new and more intimate acquaintance with this area. They have become iconic for me and often become symbolic of what I want to say about myself and events in the world.

The flower paintings and still life, I feel, are accessible in that they are for the main part optimistic and direct in execution. My influences have been many and varied – I strive to get the quality of shock at first seeing these objects (as one vaguely remembers as a child) i.e. “with new eyes” and I feel fortunate in having the opportunity to show work in such a pleasant exhibition space.”

George Hainsworth

Surface – Pete Moss & Clive Redshaw

By richardhatfield |

Pete Moss, a widely respected and collected artist, has developed a vocabulary of carefully constructed ceramic forms, whose surfaces become canvasses. These are worked with the application of rich glazes and marks that develop harmony and balance in the interaction of colour pattern and form. Surfaces bring new works that seek to extend that language. Clive Redshaw’s work is based in an intuitive response to the colour and texture of the natural world. The work in Surfaces is drawn from contrasting periods in his practice and includes both painting and tapestry. Their colour and flamboyance is very different from the considered elegance of the ceramic pieces but both share a search for a finish that resonates for the viewer.

Maria Connolly

By richardhatfield |

Glasgow born Maria graduated from Limerick School of Art and Design in 1987 and works with flat sheets of earthenware clay where she uses the clay as a building tool to explore form. The shapes that Maria builds act as a blank canvas to build texture and pattern. Her work has a utilitarian engagement with the suggestion of storytelling and a reference to childhood memories. Influenced by the natural environment that surrounds her home in the form of colour and tone Maria also takes inspiration from found objects, industrial artefacts and architecture as well as personal memory. She is interested in making objects that provide a canvas for her exploration of colour, pattern and texture.

Her work was included at the Hunt Museum exhibition celebrating forty years of ceramics in LSAD ‘Culture of Clay’ in 2014. She lives in rural Donegal where she has her studio alongside her home.

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