Monthly Archives: September 2016

David Wright

By richardhatfield |

During October in the Box Gallery, David Wright will be displaying a selection of his boxes and vessels.  David has been making pots since 1974, working in rural Leicestershire.

All work is made from coils or ropes of clay.  The slow method of working, beating and scraping the surface allows the form to be modified whilst building. Each pot is therefore very individual, a unique character, with a distinct textural surface.

The pots are glazed with simple ash glazes made from the ashes of different woods; traditional Shino glaze is also used to give warm reds and oranges.  Finally the pots are fired in a wood fuelled kiln to over 1300°c; the flame and ash from the fire give their colours and warmth to the work.

Boxes bottles and bowls are David’s reference point. It is important the pieces he makes can have some function, albeit only to hold a single flower or stem of grass. Using reclaimed wood, boxes and caddies form a large part of the work that he produces. Boxes at the Box Gallery demonstrate the diversity and unique qualities of David’s pots.

Sue Evans

By richardhatfield |

Sue Evan’s handcrafted toys will be shown in the Box Gallery from 17th September.  The collection features interesting and quirky works from recycled and collected wood.  Many of her pieces have simple movement, she incorporates mechanisms, such as cranks, cams, and levers.  If the pieces are non-moving, they are mounted on carefully chosen pieces of hardwood, such as elm, oak and popular burrs.  Sue uses are variety of acrylic paint, washed, coloured inks and seals with a matt water based varnish or wax polish.

Lee Karen Stow

By richardhatfield |

Poppies – The Colours

“In 2012 I began photographing the red common corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas) in fields around my home in the East Riding of Yorkshire. A small body of work grew into a documentary photographic project entitled Poppies: Women, War, Peace. It became a response to forgotten women of war, past and present and as a tribute to the resilience of the poppy flower itself, able to grow tall and spectacular, especially in areas of great upheaval and trauma. This work will continue to evolve until its final destination in 2018.

In the meantime, I am immersed in an intense period of study of the family Papaveraceae: the poppy family in all its colours, red, yellow, orange, pink, burgundy, white and black, plus its striking relatives such as Meconopsis, the Himalayan blue poppy. I photograph poppies in daylight as I see them. I leave the prints out in rain and hail and still they are beautiful. I press them, noticing how their pigments change and deepen, from scarlet to purple, yellow to orange, white to brown. I photograph these pressed poppies against my window, daylight revealing the threads and veins of the petals, a make-up that is the same, whatever the colour.”

Lee Karen Stow

Anomalies – Sinclair Ashman

By richardhatfield |

This show will explore the role of quick decision-making, incidentals and ‘happy accidents’ in his collagraph printmaking. Sinclair’s textured, largely abstract prints are both elemental expressions of mood and responses to everyday materials. He uses fabric edging, plastic fruit bags, plumbing washers, layers of card, gels, matchsticks and other ordinary materials to make printing plates. He then prints his compositions on fine papers, with subtle mixes of traditional and metallic inks.

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