Fathom Writers returns after a three-year break

By janetuplin |

After a three year break Fathom Writers is back and ready to breathe new life into creative writing at Barton upon Humber’s The Ropewalk.

“Fathom Writers started in 2007 and paused as an organisation three years ago but thanks to new impetus from the Northern Accent Literature project we restarting classes next month,” said treasurer, Liz Bennet.

“The group is open to anyone interested in improving their creative writing skills. Meetings are informal with a focus on contemporary writing with a range of guest workshop leaders who have included novelist Karen Maitland and performance poet John Hegley,” Liz went on.

The first of three eight-week writing courses, Telling A Story, will be led by local writer and experienced Creative Writing tutor Sue Wilsea and will start on Thursday 14th May from 6.30- 8.45pm.  The cost for the course is £80 for non-members and £75 for members.

“We all love listening to stories: they help make sense of the world around us and give shape and form to life. This course looks at how to write them,” Sue explained. “How short is a short story and when and how do they become novellas or novels? What about structure, plotting, characterization and dialogue? What makes a great beginning and a satisfying ending?”

All these questions and many more will be addressed in sessions which offer participants stimuli for writing and guidance through the construction of their own fiction.

Membership for the group costs just £10 a year and members benefit from reduced class fees and advance notification of special classes and events. You can join at any class or in the Craft Gallery at The Ropewalk.

The Ropewalk is also hosting a writing workshop, Words on the Westwood, organized as part of this year’s Beverley Folk Festival.

Held on Wednesday, May 6, the workshop will again be led by Sue and will  be full of ideas and tips on how to unlock your creativity.  Open to all, with no experience necessary, the workshop runs from 6.30pm until 8pm and costs just £5.  To book call Sue on 07985377539.

 

 

 

 

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Harrison’s Garden was originally commissioned by Connect! and presented over 5 days at Devon’s Thelma Hulbert Gallery in 2015.

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