Switched On

GALLERY ONE, | 01/11/2014 : 30/11/2014

By richardhatfield |

This exhibition brings together a collection of contemporary artists with bespoke, handmade lighting at the centre of their craft.  A variation of materials and prices are used by each using different materials to achieve their selection.

 

Hannah Nunn

After exhibiting her work in our craft gallery for many years, Hannah’s limited edition lamps were the starting point for this exhibition. Her handcut exquisite designs have been popular not only with our customers, but with many across the country.  Her work is on display in several galleries throughout Britain and in her own shop Radiance, based in Hebden Bridge.  Her inspiration comes from the tiny details in nature.

Penny Seume

Penny Seume is a textile designer using site specific imagery from the urban landscape as inspiration for atmosphere, texture and colour. By marrying traditional fine art techniques and contemporary digital print, she creates bespoke and limited edition high quality fabrics and products for interiors. Living and working in Bristol, her unique designs reference the original location in a subtle way and capture some of the inherent mood and magic.

Harriet Caslin

Design led porcelain lighting and functional tableware are handcrafted in small batches from Harriet’s boat house studio on Mersea Island, off of the Essex coast. Influenced by her Scandinavian roots, Harriet’s designs focus on simple form, linear patterned design and soft contrasting colours to invite a tactile approach to her work.

“My work is all about appealing to the senses. I love the idea of someone using one of my designs and enjoying these details; how
comfortable the cup feels in their hands when drinking tea, how the colourful light transforms a room when it’s turned on. To me this
is what creates an enduring and enjoyable relationship between the person and the functional objects that they use every day…”

Colin Chetwood

“Living in the Wye valley, an area lush with plant life and with sharply changing landscape, my work is inspired by natural elements. The river often floods covering the trees with flotsam; the sky above the Black Mountains changes from day to day sending clouds and winds scudding towards my home. The energy of this landscape permeates my work.”

Colin Chetwood is a designer and maker of handmade metal furniture and custom made lighting for office and home, based in Herefordshire. Inspired by shape and structures found in the natural world, Colin’s sculptural, contemporary furniture and lighting uses a range of materials including burnished, beaten and forged metals, glass, paper and wood.

Laura Slater

Since graduating from The Royal College of Art in 2008 Laura has been based in West Yorkshire.  From her studio all designs are created through the initial drawing process and then translated through hand printed processes.  Laura’s bespoke textile designs are all hand printed.

Sarah Lock

“Born out of a need to make use of some very large pieces of waste timber from a furniture making business, I have been making table lamps on a lathe in one corner of a triangular workshop in Brighton for quite some time. Today I still make use of waste timber such as oak and walnut and if I am lucky sometimes cherry, but most of my lamps are turned out of lime wood which has a grain which makes it suitable for sophisticated turning and allows me to finish it to a very fine finish ready for painting.

I turn them on an old Union Lathe, the idea to paint them while they are still on the lathe suggested stripes and a delight and joy with colour followed and has developed over the years to a very sophisticated level, as can be seen in the very fine stripes on my recent lamps. Eventually I felt the need to turn the lathe off and paint vertical stripes, which was very peace-full! Shapes change and evolve through the search for harmonious forms and though designs are repeated many times, each lamp will ultimately be unique in form and colour. The height of the lamps ranges from 40-60cm and are taller with shades.”

 

 

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Mary Sleigh & Jan Miller

Echoes in the Water: Traces in the Land

New artwork by Mary Sleigh and Jan Miller resonates with the local area, the landscape, history, and industry. While exploring, they have come upon traces of past activity, uncovered the unknown and unexpected, gathered natural and man-made materials and responded to the elements at different times of the year.

Mary Sleigh’s connection to the land comes from her fascination in foraging, gathering, and sorting, often giving her starting points for new work. Finding connections with places and people as a theme, continues in her exploration of the area around Barton on Humber.

Mary’s new work for Echoes in the Water: Traces in the Land celebrates the lives of those who worked in Barton, often many generations of the same family, who had family ties with local industries. 

Jan Miller collected shards of tiles bricks, sticks and stones, wood slivers, which along with her notes, photographs form the basis of her work. The single most striking image of the Humber Estuary for Jan is the glorious chocolate-brown silky mud exposed by tidal ebb and flow. Mud, silt, puddle-water, clay, earth, rock pigments have since become her new favourite mark-makers.

By richardhatfield |

Verity Adriana – Lumen | Legacy

Verity Adriana, will showcase two bodies of her photographic work at The Ropewalk in September 2020. These photographic works are a fusion of ephemeral in-scene installation and photography that use light and optical devices to convey ideas of universal connections. Selections from Adriana’s work have previously been exhibited with British Journal of Photography in Arles, France, Life Framer in Rome, Italy and the Center For Fine Art Photography in Denver, Colorado.

Adriana grew up in Hull and regularly visited her father in Barton who would narrate the history of the (then) disused rope and tile factory buildings during walks up to the river, sparking a fascination with the area.  This exhibition is the first time Lumen will be shown as a full body of work, and the artist chose The Ropewalk for this because of her connections to the place as well as it being the location of where much of these works were made.

Lumen, (2015 ongoing), made along the river Humber, investigates how light and photography have the power to transform ordinary and familiar subject matter and materials into moments of sublime experience by challenging our perceptions.  Light has the power to transform and transfix; photography is a medium that captures light; plastic is a material that holds light, and light itself is our connection to the beginnings of existence. This body of work reflects the existential human nature to look to the universal, a theme particularly relevant in the contemporary world.

Legacy, (2018), is a body of work created by Adriana in response to the legacy of the impact of the year of Hull City of Culture 2017 within the city’s spaces and places and is a synthesis of careful research done within the various communities and organisations involved and affected. The images show Adriana’s characteristic use of light, along with symbolic devices such as smoke and reflective surfaces, that challenge the viewer to consider the implications for the city and to reflect on their own experiences.

Adriana currently lives in Leeds, Yorkshire where she is Course Director of the BA Photography program at Leeds Trinity University. See www.verityadriana.com for more information.

By richardhatfield |

Lee Sass

Studio Artist, Lee Sass is our artist featured in the Box Gallery throughout September. Lee is a freelance artist, printmaker, creative director and social engagement artist. Her prints are inspired by her late husband, who worked alongside Lee in performances. These prints and textiles embody strong women and tough men, they are made from detailed card cut outs. These card cut outs are often transformed into screen prints and used on textiles. All of Lee’s work is connect by stories and linked to her past.

By devonb |

Claire Newman Williams

THERE WAS & THERE WAS NOT

Claire Newman-Williams is an British photographic artist who uses photography and collage to explore the world where imagination and reality collide.

Claire grew up in North Lincolnshire and after studying at Birmingham University she moved to the United States in 1988. She worked as a portrait photographer in Washington, DC and New York and her work appeared in numerous national and international publications including Time Magazine, The New York Times and The Advocate. Returning to the UK in 2005 she had become disenchanted by the hours she spent sitting in front of a computer tweaking digital files and making people look pretty. She wanted her work to reflect more of her life so she stopped looking for things to photograph that could be “fine art” images and started looking instead for emotions and memories, feelings and thoughts that she wanted to express.

By blending her unique photographs (often portraits that she creates with old cameras and alternative processes) with text, diagrams, and inscriptions that other generations have left behind, Claire builds visual stories of recalled experience and nostalgia. In her Story Boxes she creates collages layered and arranged in antique wooden boxes. These boxes are intended to be like inner landscapes, addressing the recurrent themes of the smothering of identity and our fear of being seen – truly seen – by those around us. The boxes themselves are sourced from auctions and house clearances and the contents of the box are the ephemera of everyday life, the junk that others throw away: old book covers, flakes of old textured paint, strips of leather, old nails, snippets of newspaper from years past.

By richardhatfield |

Inkers: Twists and Turns

Twists and Turns, a themed exhibition responding to the gallery, its history and environs.

Inkers is a group of fifteen independent artists who come together as printmakers to produce new and challenging work.

INKERS is a group of independent contemporary printmakers based in West Yorkshire, who have been working together since 2000. Members pursue successful independent practices as exhibiting artists, educators & writers, and come together to collaborate, exhibit and share practice.
During the past 20 years, the group has welcomed exciting contemporary printmakers from around Yorkshire working with a wide range of print techniques, including etching, drypoint, collagraph, screenprint, relief and photogravure. Several members have been recipients of awards and national/international project funding.

Featuring:

Neil Anderson, Cath Brooke, Shelley Burgoyne, Julia Clegg, Janine Denby, Ruth Fettis, Annie Fforde, Janine Denby, Tony Carlton, Lucy Hainsworth, Emily Harvey, Paul Hudson, June Russell, Ian Wrench & Susan Wright

By richardhatfield |

Hilary Coole

Hilary Coole is a contemporary ceramic artist producing vessels and functional ware using the process of hand built, slip decorated stoneware slabs. She studied for a degree at Carmarthen School of Art and was awarded a 1st and the accolade of student of the year in 2015. A lifelong career as a graphic designer, coupled with an interest in surface pattern design have influenced her current body of work.

The thematic focus of Hilary’s work is specifically inspired by her mother’s clothing that featured vibrant 1950s patterns which are captured in her work from both her memories of her mother and old family photographs.

Hilary’s starting point was investigating ideas about belonging, home and a sense of place. This reflective thinking flowed into investigating the form and pattern of her mother’s garments translated into clay. She uses slips, paper resist and sgraffito onto the clay then constructs vessels from these highly decorated slabs.

She works from her home studio in the heart of rural Carmarthenshire and exhibits her work in galleries throughout Wales and England, at Art Fairs and is involved in her local Open Studios event.

Hilary’s intention is to evoke the fun, emotion and utopian aims of the 1950s in contrast to post war austerity. The work she produces is a colourful, sculptural and contemporary interpretation of an influential era in her life.

 

 

By devonb |