Monthly Archives: October 2011

The Sporting League – a footballer’s dream

By janetuplin |

Nearly 10  years ago Ropewalk studio artist Marc Renshaw began  his own fictional football super league and since then the project, The Sporting League, has become a way of life for Keelby based Marc. Continue reading »

Ropery Coffee Shop receives Health Options Award

By janetuplin |

The Ropewalk’s Ropery Coffee Shop has become the first eating establishment in the town to win a North Lincolnshire Healthy Options Award. Continue reading »

The Sporting League by Marc Renshaw

By admin |

Since the age of six, artist Marc Renshaw has been recording all the joys and heartaches of his very own fictional football league. Season upon season his notebooks of handwritten scores and statistics convey the highs and lows of teams such as ‘Bayerns’, Tranquilayers’, ‘Delta’ and ‘Olby’ that make up The Sporting League.

Decades later and his obsession is still going strong as this latest exhibition shows. With yards of facts, fixtures and trivia, Marc brings his fantasy football to life creating a fully realised parallel world.

Marc studied Fine Art at the University of Wolverhampton before going onto Lincoln to complete an M.A in Illustration. His recent exhibitions include The Temporary Art Show, Wakefield, OPEM, Lincoln and a solo show at 20-21 Visual Arts Centre in Scunthorpe.

The Sporting league gained national recognition in 2007 when it was accepted for the Football art prize at The Lowry in Salford where it eventually went on to become a prizewinner.

Tranquilayers logo
Bayerns logo

Collection: Michelle Freemantle

By admin |

Michelle Freemantle, who is based in Wetwang, creates a range of stoneware pottery that is designed to be used.

Michelle has travelled extensively to pursue the development of her craft. She has studied in France, Finland and Japan, absorbing the cultural differences and attitudes to studio ceramics.

Those differences were most pronounced during her visit to Tokoname, Japan in 2000:
“Sitting with my host family in Japan, there in front of me was the evening meal. It consisted of about eight to ten bowls, dishes and plates each varying in colour, size, texture and form. Each one complimented the food it contained. Conscious thought had gone into the placing of foods and the choice of ceramics used. I liked the idea that I wasn’t simply eating to sustain my body, I was feeding my eyes and my mind at the same time.”

Michelle became more concerned with the balance between function, design and content. She strived to embody her work with meaning:
“Eating and drinking for me are social times – spending time with people you care for.”

Much of her work incorporates text in the decoration – derived from poetry – in an attempt to engage the user in the activity of eating and to make them aware of the objects in use and to consider their function.

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