Gwen Bainbridge and Alison Ogden

BOX GALLERY, | 04/08/2012 : 02/09/2012

By richardhatfield |

Both ceramicists work with porcelain and intricately decorate their work using different techniques.  Inspiration comes from different sources, but their work has a good relationship. Alison first started working with porcelain whist studying at Rochdale college of Art.  From her small garden studio in Carlisle, Cumbria, Alison produces a charming range of fine porcelain ceramics.  The range includes cups and saucers, mugs, bowls and vases, framed porcelain illustrations and porcelain with silver jewellery.  For this joint show Alison is showing a selection of her decorative yet functional ceramics.

The selection is slip cast and then individually hand manipulated to create a unique pot every time.  The craze free glaze, especially developed for Alison by her husband produces highly durable dishwasher-safe ware.

Gwen’s ceramics act as her three dimensional scrapbook, as she draws inspiration from her memories of childhood.  She’s an avid collector of all things old seen at museums or found at antique fairs.  She’s always on the look out for inspiration.

After growing up in Cumbria on a rural farm, where the woman’s place was in the home Gwen’s nostalgia for this period of time is echoed in this work.

Rather than a direct reference to the natural world Gwen prefers to explore the work of other craftsmen of the past who themselves might have once been inspired by nature.  Appreciating the finery of the costumes of previous eras, with their lavish embroidery and the distinctive qualities of their design these elements are all shown through the detail on the ceramics.  Porcelain and bone china lend themselves perfectly to this amount of detail, receiving imprints and markings.

 

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Steve Upton

Marking The Surface

I paint what is around me, the bus station, the derelict shop fronts, the forgotten corners, the every day for so many.

I like that uniquely English outlook that is an uneasy combination of the humorous, somewhat grotesque and surreal and is often a celebration of the grainy side of life.

As a figurative painter within this culture I look for the odd or bizarre which might be stumbled upon in unexpected places, the visually tense and the sense of decay and abuse of lives, expectations and property in the urban landscape. And, of course, the surfaces layered with statements: political, heartfelt, personal and rude.

By richardhatfield |

Letitia Thompson

Little Paintings from a small village

Living in a North Lincolnshire village provides year round inspiration.
The seasons are so clearly defined and bring their own colour palette and narrative.
There are patchwork fields, snippets of half forgotten stories and creatures that scurry past with their own tales to tell.

I never plan what, or who, I am going to paint, and so it is always a surprise to see what story wishes to be told. Anyone is welcome to appear on my canvas though, from the Queen Of The May to the cheeky sparrow!

This collection of paintings tries to capture fragments from the four seasons and, I hope, a slightly slower pace of life.

By richardhatfield |

Collection – Debbie Barber

Debbie first trained as a textile artist, specialising in embroidery and surface decoration. After 10 years she returned to college to retrain as a potter having a life-long interest in ceramics. Now Debbie combines her love of colour, texture and pattern that she used in her textiles with her new medium, clay. Debbie specialises in naked Raku and sawdust firing enjoying the hands on and dynamic process of Raku firing. Using resists she uses smoke to ‘paint’ patterns on the surface of the clay.

The finished pieces are burnished and polished to give them a soft satin sheen. Debbie takes inspiration from the natural world, birds, trees and leaves for example. Her forms are simple, strong shapes and she uses surface pattern to introduce complexity and interest.

By richardhatfield |

Gillian Hobson – Lightlines

Gillian Hobson’s enduring concerns of colour, light and space find new form in Lightlines, a major showing of contemporary works. Working with photography, moving image, sound and installation she explores and expresses the intuitive resonances at play between us and the spaces we live in. Using imagery amassed from an intimate study of light and shadow in her own home, she sets up tensions between the affective dimensions of environmental experience, investigating how light can be used to articulate the complex relation of person to place through ideas of the real/imaginary, familiar/strange. In Lightlines the photograph, as a suspended moment, is mobilised as a site and sight of speculation and conjecture, taking different forms which represent the particular and evolving conditions of where life takes place and the poetic dimensions therein. Stemming from her background with glass sculpture and architectural space, works use movement, light and scale to function as transforming and transporting mechanisms, making new configurations and readings of interior spaces and our relationship with them possible.

By richardhatfield |

Barton upon Humber successful in Museum resilience fund bid

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The money, awarded by Arts Council England’s Museum resilience fund, will see the town’s history move into the modern era and create an enhanced visitor experience, professional marketing, digital presence, and greater exposure to the outside world. (more…)

By janetuplin |

Readers’ Day at The Ropewalk

The north of England is home to some of this country’s most exciting writers and on Saturday, March 14, three of them, Natalie Haynes, Stephen May and Helen Cadbury are welcomed to Ropery Hall for Readers’ Day.

“Whether you love reading or have always wanted to find out how writers get published or what goes into researching a book or if you just want to hear great stories from those who write them, join us for Readers’ Saturday – a chance to get to know these three terrifically entertaining writers in the company of fellow book lovers,” said Liz Bennet of The Ropewalk (more…)

By janetuplin |