Gwen Bainbridge and Alison Ogden

BOX GALLERY, | 04/08/2012 : 02/09/2012

By richardhatfield |

Both ceramicists work with porcelain and intricately decorate their work using different techniques.  Inspiration comes from different sources, but their work has a good relationship. Alison first started working with porcelain whist studying at Rochdale college of Art.  From her small garden studio in Carlisle, Cumbria, Alison produces a charming range of fine porcelain ceramics.  The range includes cups and saucers, mugs, bowls and vases, framed porcelain illustrations and porcelain with silver jewellery.  For this joint show Alison is showing a selection of her decorative yet functional ceramics.

The selection is slip cast and then individually hand manipulated to create a unique pot every time.  The craze free glaze, especially developed for Alison by her husband produces highly durable dishwasher-safe ware.

Gwen’s ceramics act as her three dimensional scrapbook, as she draws inspiration from her memories of childhood.  She’s an avid collector of all things old seen at museums or found at antique fairs.  She’s always on the look out for inspiration.

After growing up in Cumbria on a rural farm, where the woman’s place was in the home Gwen’s nostalgia for this period of time is echoed in this work.

Rather than a direct reference to the natural world Gwen prefers to explore the work of other craftsmen of the past who themselves might have once been inspired by nature.  Appreciating the finery of the costumes of previous eras, with their lavish embroidery and the distinctive qualities of their design these elements are all shown through the detail on the ceramics.  Porcelain and bone china lend themselves perfectly to this amount of detail, receiving imprints and markings.

 

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Here, There and The Elsewhere

This touring exhibition of painting, sculpture, photography and video by Graham Underhill is visiting five venues during 2014.

The work in the exhibition explores space, time and the ways in which memory and anticipation influence the perception of place. These themes are treated both generally and in ways specific to the five localities. Based on the environment of Barton-upon-Humber, Underhill has produced a large painting in oil on canvas, a series small works on paper, a collection of photographs and has collaborated with a senior residents and pupils from Castledyke Primary School in the making of a short video film.

During the show Graham Underhill will be running exhibition related workshops for Castledyke Primary School and Baysgarth School.

A small satellite display in Barton Library for the duration of the exhibition will challenge people, with a selection of unusual photographs, to see how well they know Barton.

The project has its own website: www.herethereandtheelsewhere.com with dedicated Barton pages.

 

By richardhatfield |

Ropewalk Open Day a success

The Ropewalk’s Open day, held earlier this month, attracted more than 500 visitors curious to find out what did go on behind the scenes of their quarter-mile long building in Barton upon Humber.

The corridors along the length of the Maltkiln Road building were full of activity as those curious to see what went on in parts of the building not normally open to the public. (more…)

By janetuplin |

Melvyn Petterson

Melvyn was born in Cleethorpes and studied at Grimsby and Camberwell Schools of Art before setting up Artichoke Print Workshop in south London in 1993. He has work in the collection of the British Museum and is a member of the Royal Society of Painter Printmakers and the New English Art Club.

Melvyn says of his work: “My landscapes often centre around the drama played out in nature, a dark cloud threatens, a sudden burst of sunlight, a moody sky against snow covered fields. These are the times when nature displays her more provocative side; probably for just a few seconds; these often fleeting moments I have tried to capture in my images.”

 

By richardhatfield |

The Ropewalk opens its doors on Saturday, April 5

This is the second time that The Ropewalk has held such an open day and Managing Director Liz Bennet is hoping that this year’s event will be just, if not more, successful than the first open day two years ago.

“We want to show visitors exactly what goes on daily behind the doors of this Grade Two listed building – not just in the galleries, exhibition spaces, Coffee Shop and Museum,” she said.

“Our Open Day is the ideal opportunity to take a close look at The Ropewalk’s artists’ studios, the creative business units or the facilities which are available for hire,” she continued.

Various artists including Melanie Rainbow, Wendy Chan, Janine Knight and Michael and Helen Scrimshaw will be opening up their studios and three tenants in the Creative Industries units will also be opening their doors.  Knitter and wool producer Alison Casserly will be demonstrating her work, milliner Rosalie Marwood-Miller will be giving hat fitting demonstrations and couture dressmaker and designer Jane White will be sharing her expertise.

In addition, Nigel Brown of the Nigel Brown Cookery Academy will be giving demonstrations and Neo Heny will be giving yoga taster sessions in the morning between 10am and noon.

“We will also be welcoming Barton’s Town Mayor, Cllr Janet Oxley, and her consort, Cllr John Oxley, along with their Civic Party during the day,” Liz went on.

The Ropewalk will be open from 10am until 4pm and admission is free.

By janetuplin |

Potter Rachel Wood features this month in Box Gallery

Work by ceramicist Rachel Wood features throughout March in the Box Gallery at The Ropewalk in Barton upon Humber.

Her individual pieces are made using stoneware clay which are coiled, slabbed or thrown and frequently distorted during the process.
(more…)

By janetuplin |

Collection: Rachel Wood

Rachel Wood makes individual pieces using stoneware clay, which are coiled, slabbed or thrown, and frequently distorted during the process. The natural spontaneous qualities of the clay are important to her so that each pot conveys its own spirit and character. She wants her pots to have a pulse and a heartbeat; hence she works in a very free and unrestrained way. Her recent travels in Australia and working with potter, Robin Welch, have been pivotal in her development. The colours, shapes and the textures of the landscape, in particular the Dark Peak areas around Kinder, Derbyshire, provide constant inspiration.

“My personal intuitive touch is an integral part of these pots – a dent in the soft clay, a tear, rip, and a finger or handprint in the glaze. I want the marks to reflect the journey of exploration and learning in each pot, just as a wrinkle depicts expression and character in a human face. The scratch of a metal kidney, the groove of a wooden twig, a sweep of a brush, they all create a linear dynamic on the surface of the pot. Some are deliberate, some incidental; none are removed, as they are all part and parcel of the pot’s character. It is inspired by the strong need we all have to be touched.”

To view the exhibition catalogue please click here

 

By richardhatfield |