Successful VAQAS inspection for The Ropewalk

By janetuplin |

The highly acclaimed arts centre, The Ropewalk in Barton upon Humber, has again been praised in its fourth assessment for the prestigious Visitor Attraction Quality Assurance Scheme (VAQAS) which is managed by VisitEngland.

According to the independent assessor, who both visited and phoned the centre anonymously, The Ropewalk continues to offer “an overall very good quality visitor experience” and fully merits the award of VisitEngland’s accreditation of Quality Assured Visitor Attraction.

In the report, the assessor adds that further fine-tuning of standards in some areas would help to exceed the visitor’s expectations and raise the overall standard towards excellent.

“We are absolutely delighted that once again The Ropewalk has been recognised as giving its visitors – whether to the exhibitions, the Craft Gallery, the Museum or the Coffee Shop – such a positive experience, said The Ropewalk’s Managing Director, Liz Bennet.

“We always hope that our visitors will feel that The Ropewalk ‘experience’ is a positive one and that they will return again and again,” she said.

During the visit the assessor noted that the Craft Gallery and Coffee Shop provided high quality ancillary facilities to the museum and galleries and friendly and welcoming staff continue to be a strong point enhancing the visitor’s experience.

And recent work, funded by Arts Council England, LEADER and Ian and Mark Proudfoot, to enhance the exterior environment of the building with the resurfacing of the Promenade and the future installation of new gates and fencing, now in place, was also noted.

 

Latest News

VIEW ALL NEWS

Michael Thacker

“The primary reference point for my sculpture are natural forms such as seedpods, shells, fossils and plant buds, combining this with the geometric construction found in architectural elements and the principles of devices such as pediments and arch-ways.

The idea of an inner form plays and important part in my work, a form developing and growing within a hard outer casing to burst forth revealing a new form, unbalancing the original, juxtaposing taut polished geometric forms against roughly textured organic forms emerging from within.

More recent work has become more involved with using light within the work, whether the simple act of a gilded area reflecting light to accentuate or using the same principle to create a glow within the centre of the stone with a gilded area surrounding a hidden pierced section allowing light to travel through to illuminate an otherwise shadowed area.”

By richardhatfield |

Daniel Boyle

Living and working in West Wales, Daniel produces salt glazed wood fired ceramics. His pieces are contemporary and functional, all wheel thrown. He combines traditional and modern ways of working, firing in a 75 cubic foot catenary arched kiln with wood to 1300o centigrade. These firings produce many original surfaces and colours. His aim is to create works which are individual and original in design and execution.
Using slips of different vitrifying temperatures and with the use of a spray gun Daniel layers them on top of each other, putting the most vitreous on the top and then firing to make this top layer break and move leaving the undercoat stable to create a base colour, exaggerating the salt glaze effect.

By richardhatfield |

Watersmeet: John Martin

Watersmeet is a series of abstract works linked by the theme of water’s movement and passage from rain to river to estuary and sea, reflecting on the ultimate fragility of our relationship with water – always in flux, a constant process of renewal and erosion.

John explains that his work is …“An exploration of the visual shaping and marking over time that this eroding process leaves on both natural and constructed forms.” “… a reflection on the emotive and symbolic connections of water, deeply embedded in the human psyche. In cultures both ancient and modern around the globe, rivers and seas can be symbols for: rites of passage, crossing over, carrier of messengers, site of ritual, A life giver and taker, divider of worlds and home to a multitude of gods, demons and fantastic creatures.”

“We are drawn to water and its mysterious duality of nature and in keeping with this duality we can at one and the same time rejoice in its beauty and be fearful of its potential.”

By richardhatfield |

Fourth North Lincolnshire Print Open

The fourth biennial North Lincolnshire Print Open at The Ropewalk in Barton upon Humber has just opened to critical acclaim at a Preview Evening which attracted more than 100 art lovers.

A silk screen, 2, by Amie Andrews of Cleethorpes was the unanimous choice for the selectors’ prize chosen by Melvyn Petterson and Alf Ludlam and while the second prize, sponsored by GKD Litho of Hull, went to North Bank artist Debbie Grice of Lockington near Driffield for her Maywoodtype print of Peacocks and Furrows.

(more…)

By janetuplin |

Barton Food Festival

Final preparations are underway for the first of two Food Festivals being held in Barton this year.

Six months after the final Barton Farmers’ Market, producers return to King Street for the Barton Food Festival which will take place between 9am and 3pm. (more…)

By janetuplin |

Collection: Virginia Graham

Virginia’s ceramics are an eclectic amalgamation of nostalgic form and imagery, transforming the ordinary past by drawing on a wide range of domestic traditions.

Virginia uses a combination of slip casting and hand building techniques to create pieces in her signature style. Their surface decoration includes slip painting, enamel transfer printing and metallic lustres referring to historical wares including the familiar blue and white stripes of Cornish Ware as well as industrial plumbing and Victorian fabrics.

By richardhatfield |