Opening of third biennial North Lincolnshire Print Open

By janetuplin |

The third biennial North Lincolnshire Print Open at The Ropewalk in Barton upon Humber has just opened to critical acclaim.

Hull artist and Hull College lecturer Lindy Norton’s print, Martin’s Room, was the unanimous choice of selectors Melvyn Petterson and Alf Ludlam for the first prize.  Lindy previously  earned her living as an illustrator in London for 17 years.

Another Hull based artist Sara Clark won second prize with her etching, The House of Bone, while third place went to Lincoln artist Alan Abbey for his print, Whitby, with the final prize being awarded to London based Stephen Robson with his print Marsh 2.

 In all 115 prints were selected by Cleethorpes born Melvyn Petterson, who is a member of the Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers and runs Artichoke Printmaking Workshop in Brixton, and artist and former Grimsby School of Art lecturer, Alf Ludlam,

 Speaking after the selection, Melvyn commented: “We very much enjoyed the range of subject matter and the variety and use of medium. We chose a couple of humorous pieces in the Highly Commended section because we believe humour can be used as a vehicle for serious comment as well as making people laugh.”

“It was not an easy choice. To those who were not successful we would say please continue to submit work in the future,” he continued.

The Ropewalk’s Exhibition’s Officer, Richard Hatfield added:  “The aim of this exhibition is to show the very best of contemporary printmaking.”

The exhibition, which is sponsored by Intaglio Printmaker, Hawthorn Printmaker Supplies and GKD Litho of Hull, continues until Sunday, September 9, and The Ropewalk is open from Monday to Saturday between 10am and 5pm and Sundays and Bank Holidays between 10am and 4pm.

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David Wright

During October in the Box Gallery, David Wright will be displaying a selection of his boxes and vessels.  David has been making pots since 1974, working in rural Leicestershire.

All work is made from coils or ropes of clay.  The slow method of working, beating and scraping the surface allows the form to be modified whilst building. Each pot is therefore very individual, a unique character, with a distinct textural surface.

The pots are glazed with simple ash glazes made from the ashes of different woods; traditional Shino glaze is also used to give warm reds and oranges.  Finally the pots are fired in a wood fuelled kiln to over 1300°c; the flame and ash from the fire give their colours and warmth to the work.

Boxes bottles and bowls are David’s reference point. It is important the pieces he makes can have some function, albeit only to hold a single flower or stem of grass. Using reclaimed wood, boxes and caddies form a large part of the work that he produces. Boxes at the Box Gallery demonstrate the diversity and unique qualities of David’s pots.

By richardhatfield |

Sue Evans

Sue Evan’s handcrafted toys will be shown in the Box Gallery from 17th September.  The collection features interesting and quirky works from recycled and collected wood.  Many of her pieces have simple movement, she incorporates mechanisms, such as cranks, cams, and levers.  If the pieces are non-moving, they are mounted on carefully chosen pieces of hardwood, such as elm, oak and popular burrs.  Sue uses are variety of acrylic paint, washed, coloured inks and seals with a matt water based varnish or wax polish.

By richardhatfield |

Lee Karen Stow

Poppies – The Colours

“In 2012 I began photographing the red common corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas) in fields around my home in the East Riding of Yorkshire. A small body of work grew into a documentary photographic project entitled Poppies: Women, War, Peace. It became a response to forgotten women of war, past and present and as a tribute to the resilience of the poppy flower itself, able to grow tall and spectacular, especially in areas of great upheaval and trauma. This work will continue to evolve until its final destination in 2018.

In the meantime, I am immersed in an intense period of study of the family Papaveraceae: the poppy family in all its colours, red, yellow, orange, pink, burgundy, white and black, plus its striking relatives such as Meconopsis, the Himalayan blue poppy. I photograph poppies in daylight as I see them. I leave the prints out in rain and hail and still they are beautiful. I press them, noticing how their pigments change and deepen, from scarlet to purple, yellow to orange, white to brown. I photograph these pressed poppies against my window, daylight revealing the threads and veins of the petals, a make-up that is the same, whatever the colour.”

Lee Karen Stow

By richardhatfield |

Anomalies – Sinclair Ashman

This show will explore the role of quick decision-making, incidentals and ‘happy accidents’ in his collagraph printmaking. Sinclair’s textured, largely abstract prints are both elemental expressions of mood and responses to everyday materials. He uses fabric edging, plastic fruit bags, plumbing washers, layers of card, gels, matchsticks and other ordinary materials to make printing plates. He then prints his compositions on fine papers, with subtle mixes of traditional and metallic inks.

By richardhatfield |

Katy O’Neil

Katy has worked with clay for over 20 years, from her Lancashire studio she creates contemporary ceramic vessels and handmade ceramic jewellery. The vessels, bowls and wall plaques are decorated with slips before being impressed with marks which are inspired by her photographs taken whilst travelling extensively. Each piece is decorated with splashes and layers of colour to highlight the texture and mark making before firing to stoneware. Every item created by Katy is slab built with black clay and are a celebration of material and mark making.

“The marks made on my work are created with man-made objects such as screws and nails found on the street, or from parts of circuit boards salvaged from abandoned electrical goods. This way of impressing marks into clay is a reflection of my long-held fascination with the concept of future fossils and how the throw away nature of modern life affects the land.”

By richardhatfield |

Fly by Wire – Chris Moss

Chris Moss creates sculptures of beasts and birds in order to understand them better.  Time spent watching animals gives her an understanding of their framework and architecture as well as how they interact with each other.  Her curiosity is linked to their movement and how this can be recreated.  She finds that drawing focuses her observations allowing the natural extension into wire sculpture.

With the use of new and reclaimed materials, sourced from various suppliers of functional wire and metal products or fragments found on walks and forays Chris experiments with the balance between these materials, so that a work, as well as saying something about its subject, is still about the materials it’s made from and reveals aspects of the drawing and re-drawing process.

By richardhatfield |