Opening of third biennial North Lincolnshire Print Open

By janetuplin |

The third biennial North Lincolnshire Print Open at The Ropewalk in Barton upon Humber has just opened to critical acclaim.

Hull artist and Hull College lecturer Lindy Norton’s print, Martin’s Room, was the unanimous choice of selectors Melvyn Petterson and Alf Ludlam for the first prize.  Lindy previously  earned her living as an illustrator in London for 17 years.

Another Hull based artist Sara Clark won second prize with her etching, The House of Bone, while third place went to Lincoln artist Alan Abbey for his print, Whitby, with the final prize being awarded to London based Stephen Robson with his print Marsh 2.

 In all 115 prints were selected by Cleethorpes born Melvyn Petterson, who is a member of the Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers and runs Artichoke Printmaking Workshop in Brixton, and artist and former Grimsby School of Art lecturer, Alf Ludlam,

 Speaking after the selection, Melvyn commented: “We very much enjoyed the range of subject matter and the variety and use of medium. We chose a couple of humorous pieces in the Highly Commended section because we believe humour can be used as a vehicle for serious comment as well as making people laugh.”

“It was not an easy choice. To those who were not successful we would say please continue to submit work in the future,” he continued.

The Ropewalk’s Exhibition’s Officer, Richard Hatfield added:  “The aim of this exhibition is to show the very best of contemporary printmaking.”

The exhibition, which is sponsored by Intaglio Printmaker, Hawthorn Printmaker Supplies and GKD Litho of Hull, continues until Sunday, September 9, and The Ropewalk is open from Monday to Saturday between 10am and 5pm and Sundays and Bank Holidays between 10am and 4pm.

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Susan Evans

Sue Evans has been a regular exhibitor in the Craft Gallery since The Ropewalk opened in 2000 but this is her first solo exhibition here in the Box Gallery. Her Quirky pieces made from driftwood and other found objects are beautifully painted and often feature an element of movement using mechanisms such as cranks, cams and levers. Although essentially children’s toys, her work has a great appeal to adults too with its nostalgic charm referencing Folk Art, the natural world, the seaside and childhoods of yesteryear!

By richardhatfield |

Under East Wind

Harriet Tarlo and Judith Tucker | Linda Ingham and David Power

Under East Wind brings together visual art, poetry, film and music in this interdisciplinary exhibition which shows work by artists deeply engaged with the Lincolnshire landscape and how personal, industrial and recreational memories linger in place.

In Outfalls Harriet Tarlo and Judith Tucker present poems and drawings from their

collaboration on the Louth Navigation in North East Lincolnshire. Through juxtaposing open-form poems and monochrome drawings they explore the relationship between the River Ludd and the canal itself as its industrial past becomes absorbed into semi-wilderness, creating niches for local flora and fauna in its culverts, bridges and locks.

In Far & Near and Kinds of White, Linda Ingham and David Power bring their collaborative work mixing painting and print with installation and music, which explores the nature of the secular memorial and how we use recreational space, in particular the coastal paths of North East Lincolnshire.


Remember Me – David Power



By richardhatfield |

Sally Beaumont – Sacred and Profane

Sally trained at Hornsey College of Art under Michael Rothenstein and Bartholomew Dos Santos at the Slade School. Her expertise and repertoire as a printmaker has expanded over time generating deep layers of imagery. Sally’s etchings and lithographs can be described both  as decorative and chaotic. Her subject matter is eclectic, ranging from medieval Christian Symbolism, acid-etched metal armour, to fashion and horsemanship in Renaissance Europe. These influences combine to create a series of collaged prints that are both personal and distinct.

By richardhatfield |

The Owlery

Created by Benjamin Partridge, The Owlery focuses on the development of surface pattern design, developing complex or interesting surface patterns from single motifs. He uses lino and wood cut techniques alongside screen printing to create textiles, ceramics products and fine art prints. The Owlery products are predominantly inspired by the British woodland and current affairs relating to the protection of British animals and insects, as well as a general fascination by the world around us.

Benjamin designs, makes and sells textile, ceramic and paper products which are functional and visually appealing with just a hint of whimsy, as well as original fine art screen and lino prints.

Benjamin has exhibited at trade fairs as well as retail shows over the last few years but this is the first time The Ropewalk has showcased his work bringing you a vibrant collection for Spring 2018.

By richardhatfield |

Full Circle – Doug Binder

“Concentrating on the life model as I do now has meant coming full-circle from my early studies as a 16 year old student at Bradford College of Art in the late 1950’s. I left Bradford for London and the Royal College where abstraction became my primary interest for some considerable time.

My conversion back to life drawing coincided with a move back to my roots in the north, and the need to return to some basic fundamentals. Painting the figure brought back early memories of that first life room. I recalled the claustrophobic effects of the constant heat from the one-bar electric fires, the pungent aroma of oil and turpentine, and above all I recalled the silent dedication of the student engaged in an absorbing ritual.

In the fifties we were trained to paint, and the life room was the symbolic heart of our aspiration. It was clear that to become an artist would take a long time – and much of that time would be spent in painting ‘from the life’. Some 50 years later in my case, I find that this is still my priority. Each painting is a new proposition. The risk of failure is high, the problem of resolving such a subtle form is always the same challenge, yet different enough to seem uniquely fresh each time.

As Painter in Residence at Dean Clough in Halifax, I am fortunate in having a studio more or less attached to the galleries, where I work on around 20 paintings at any one time, depending on how well each is progressing.

At present the nude figure is all that interests me as a subject for painting. The nude in history is always fascinating. The mythical, psychological and sexual aspects are constantly present, but for me, it’s the universal yet ordinary experience that I’m interested in – the common-place.”


By richardhatfield |

The Studio Artists’ Show

The annual exhibition of work by artist based at The Ropewalk.

Featuring: Sally Beaumont, Wendy Chan, Janine Knight, Debbie Grice, Gill Hobson, Richard Hatfield, Tim Needham, Michael Scrimshaw, Keith Woodcock, Shirley Trumble, Melanie Rainbow and Emily Connor.

By richardhatfield |