Ropery Coffee Shop wins Healthy Options Award

By janetuplin |

The Ropewalk’s Ropery Coffee Shop has become the first eating establishment in the area to win a North Lincolnshire Healthy Options Award.

The award aims to reward those premises that serve food to the public who give a wide choice of healthier options on their menus to chips and high sugar snacks.

Coffee Shop manager Amanda Foster said she was delighted to have won a Silver Award to accompany the Five Stars awarded under the “Scores on the Doors” food hygiene scheme.

“The great majority of the menu we serve is vegetarian and we also offer weekly seasonal specials such as soups and pies in the chillier months and a range of salads during the warmer weather,” she said.

“And at the Coffee Shop we are also proud that many of our products come from local producers or are Fair Trade products,” Amanda continued.

“Receiving this award means that we have been recognized for what we have aimed to do ever since the Coffee Shop opened in the mid-2000s – creating tasty, appetizing food which has been prepared in a healthy way and served in a healthy environment,” she went on.

This Healthy Options Award forms part of the overall obesity strategy for North Lincolnshire to enable those who wish to eat a more healthy diet to do so more easily.

The Ropery Coffee Shop is open every day and serves freshly cooked food including light lunches, snacks and cakes.  Free wi-fi is also available to its customers.

 

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George Hainsworth

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George Hainsworth

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Remember Me – David Power

Read LOUTH CANAL POEMS & PAST WINTERS SONNETS  by Harriet Tarlo


www.far&nearproject.com

www.projectoutfalls.com

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