Ropery Coffee Shop wins Healthy Options Award

By janetuplin |

The Ropewalk’s Ropery Coffee Shop has become the first eating establishment in the area to win a North Lincolnshire Healthy Options Award.

The award aims to reward those premises that serve food to the public who give a wide choice of healthier options on their menus to chips and high sugar snacks.

Coffee Shop manager Amanda Foster said she was delighted to have won a Silver Award to accompany the Five Stars awarded under the “Scores on the Doors” food hygiene scheme.

“The great majority of the menu we serve is vegetarian and we also offer weekly seasonal specials such as soups and pies in the chillier months and a range of salads during the warmer weather,” she said.

“And at the Coffee Shop we are also proud that many of our products come from local producers or are Fair Trade products,” Amanda continued.

“Receiving this award means that we have been recognized for what we have aimed to do ever since the Coffee Shop opened in the mid-2000s – creating tasty, appetizing food which has been prepared in a healthy way and served in a healthy environment,” she went on.

This Healthy Options Award forms part of the overall obesity strategy for North Lincolnshire to enable those who wish to eat a more healthy diet to do so more easily.

The Ropery Coffee Shop is open every day and serves freshly cooked food including light lunches, snacks and cakes.  Free wi-fi is also available to its customers.

 

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By December 31 last year a total of 106,861 visitors had passed through The Ropewalk’s doors compared to 78,412 in 2013. (more…)

By janetuplin |

Record breaking year for The Ropewalk

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Visitor figures up to and including November are the highest recorded since the Maltkiln Road arts centre opened nearly 15 years ago and with December’s figures yet to be logged it looks as if more than 100,000 people will have visited the venue during the past 12 months. (more…)

By janetuplin |

Collection: Rick Henham

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Rick originally trained at the University of Westminster and lived in London for many years before relocating to Cornwall. His Cornish surroundings have influenced this current range.

“Plain forms worked to a completely smooth finish help create the effect I’m after in this range of work. Comprised mainly of black and white bowls and vases with a simple motif cut into the glaze….weather worn pebbles, surf on the shore and the meandering horizon line are an influence.”

By richardhatfield |

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Tooby creates artwork using images as a medium, to encourage debate through purposefully choosing controversial and sometimes difficult/uncomfortable subject matters to share a message. He shuns the single visual for a network of linked pieces in which the connections between pictures – as well as what is left out – contain information which then springs from an apparent void to provide messages which transcend the ability of any single image to communicate. The use of found materials and installations, as in his recent acclaimed exhibition “Eye Spy”, (In aid of a Homeless Charity) adds a fourth dimension and enhances surface to further expand his visual vocabulary.

As a consequence, he produces work which is current, inspiring, original, and, photographically speaking, quite different to the norm. His work is direct, occasionally brutal, creative of opinion and sometimes shocking, but it leaves little doubt as to where his own opinions lie. Thought provoking; his work invites the viewer to accept, reject or else debate that opinion.

The Price of Money was originally conceived as an art book and because it is based, in part, on his own experience of business it inevitably contains veins of autobiography. His assertion that rampant greed sowed the seeds of the 2008 credit crunch is clear from the work, but the effects of the greed-associated business paradigm reaches far deeper levels, perverting politics as well as the lives, relationships and health of those involved to varying degrees. He implies that enterprise doesn’t have to be conducted that way – that commercial activities can be carried out ethically and can, as a result, provide a more stable and productive business.

By richardhatfield |

Clive Redshaw – Gathering

Gathering
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By richardhatfield |

Winter Solstice

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By richardhatfield |