Insight Open Studios 2010

By admin |

The first weekend of Northern Lincolnshire Artists’ Insight Open Studios 2010 got off to a flying start with record numbers passing through studios throughout North and North East Lincolnshire.

Project manager Pete Mitchell of The Ropewalk in Barton upon Humber said that the opening weekend of the event, now in its 10th year, had proved to be very busy.

“Here at The Ropewalk I think we must have welcomed around 500 visitors over the first two days while at Grimsby both the two outlets in Freshney Place and the Abbey Walk Gallery were really busy too,” he continued.

One artist showing for the first time at The Ropewalk was printmaker Angela Lindsley who in previous years has exhibited as part of the gallery’s Printmakers Group.

“It was absolutely brilliant,” she said.  “I sold five pieces on the first day and an extra date has had to be added to the two already advertised workshops, “ Introduction to Collagraph Prints, I am running in the next couple of months are they are now nearly all booked up.”

“It was an absolutely fantastic weekend and I can’t believe the response and I am so happy I decided to take part as a stand-alone artist,” she continued.

Insight Open Studios continues for the second and final weekend on Saturday and Sunday (September 25 and 26) with studios and galleries from Cleethorpes and Grimsby in the east to Epworth and the surrounding area to the west open to the public.

As well as being able to watch artists at work there is also the opportunity to view, purchase or commission original pieces of art.

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I ka Piko

I ka Piko: The center or source, connections and balance.

“I ka Piko not only describes our cultural relationships but also the islands we come from, growing up from the middle of the vast oceanic floor of the Pacific.

In “I ka Piko” nine Hawai’I print artists explore through their work what it means to a Kama’aina (child of this land) to be from this unique place.”

Featuring

Gina Bacon Kerr,

Marissa Eshima

Kathy Merrill Kelley,

Barbara Okamoto

Mary Philpotts McGrath

Doug Po’oloa Tolentino

David B. Smith

Nancy Vilhauer

George Woollard

 

 

 

 

By richardhatfield |

Pru Green

A new selection of ceramics just arrived

By richardhatfield |

John D Petty – Mud and Spit

Five Drawings of Holderness Churches

That these small Holderness villages should have churches of such antiquity has long fascinated me. It is a solid reflection of the prosperity of the area when farming the land was everything. Nineteenth century census records show that in some villages more than half of the male population aged twenty and over were employed as agricultural labourers. My own great grandmother was a domestic servant at a South Holderness farm.

In speaking of sacred places in general, a friend who was closely involved in the development of the drawings said “The reason I love them is the emotional intensity and meaning that people invest in these spaces. It’s to do with mortality and the realisation of what matters to humanity…death, birth, praying for the healing or protection of loved ones, what I think of as the mud and spit of life. Personal stories are engrained in the stones, land, architecture of such spaces, they are dense with them and I feel a very strong connection to that because it’s meaningful stuff.”

These drawings are an attempt to symbolise some of those stories that are held within the stones, the bricks and the cobbles of these buildings. The drawing process involves repeatedly making and disrupting the drawing; the drawing is done with graphite and the disruption is done with gesso and by scouring and scratching the surface with sharp tools. In places new paper is sometimes collaged on; this may be to repair an area where I wish to start again or it may serve no purpose other than to develop the textural qualities of the drawing.

As the work progressed I came to see the contrast between the more carefully rendered elements and the loose and random textures of other areas as an oblique reference to the buildings’ decay, their rebuilding and restoration, their survival over centuries of change and struggle, the mud and spit, indeed, of daily life.

The obscured and hidden layers of the drawings reflect the layers of history and the stories that the buildings have seen. It is right that some of the drawing is obscured and lost as are the lives and stories of the people that once invested so much in these places.

By richardhatfield |

James and Tilla Waters

James and Tilla met each other during their apprenticeships to the potter Rupert Spira in Shropshire in  the late nineties. In 2002 they set up their workshop in Carmarthenshire where they live with their three daughters.

They both have degrees in Painting (James from The Slade and Tilla from Bath) and value that background for the greater understanding of form, colour and materials it has given them in making pots.

They believe passionately in the importance of functionality; simply being hand-made is not enough but when an object is well made and a joy to use it can become a cherished possession and make an enriching contribution to daily life.

Their working roles are many and complex but in summary, James makes and Tilla designs.

They won the Wesley-Barrell Craft Awards (Vessels for Interiors) in 2011 and The Homes and Gardens Design Awards (Ceramics and Glass) in 2013.

 

By richardhatfield |

Madeline & Martin Pick

Now & Then: Spurn Point – A Special Place

Spurn Point, to the east of Hull has inspired a body of work by husband and wife team Madeline and Martin Pick who have worked on the project over the past few years exploring the evocative mystery of Spurn and witnessing dramatic changes at the sand spit as time and tide continue to erode and reshape its landscape.

Madeline working primarily with paint and mixed media on canvas has approached the subject by working and building layers of texture and meaning into her pieces.  “You respond at many levels to Spurn.  It arouses emotions as you consider the lives lived and the events witnessed and it stimulates memories as you enter the time capsules represented by the prefab buildings and consider the paths of your own life”.

Photographer  Martin sees Spurn Point as a unique and fascinating landscape.  “We are both impressed by its remote beauty and ability to stir memories, bringing them to the surface.  We have tried to represent and record our response to place and the interaction of successive generations of people with it.  Above all the ‘big sky’ dominates and is a feature of my photographic interpretation”.

By richardhatfield |

Spring Selection

A seasonal selection of Ropewalk regulars featuring ceramics by Ken Eardley, Sue Dunne, Lyn Lovitt, Elizabeth Maynard, Mary Johnson, David Hilton with the addition of sculpture by Janine Knight and Chris Moss.

By richardhatfield |