New Developments at The Ropewalk

By admin |

Printmakers at Barton upon Humber’s Contemporary Art & Craft will soon be using enhanced facilities at the Maltkiln Road venue thanks to a £15,000 Arts Council England grant.

Printmaking sessions at The Ropewalk have been suspended until mid-September to allow the work to take place.

Richard Hatfield of The Ropewalk explained that the current printmaking studio was part of the first phase in the restoration of the building which opened in 2000.

“Initially we obtained funding to restore the southern end of the Hall’s Barton Ropery ropewalk which had been derelict for 10 years,” he said.

“But as time has gone on, particularly since the rest of the building was opened in 2006, it has become apparent that the studio’s original location was not ideal.”

Now the Arts Council grant means that the studio will be located within the corridor housing the artists’ studios in the middle of the quarter-mile long building.

The relocation of the print studio will also have a knock-on effect for some other facilities in the building.

One of the few remaining picture framing facilities in the area will take over the space left by the print studio while in turn the Craft Gallery will expand into the area vacated by the picture framing unit.

Local craftsman Dave Ayres of Deepdale Studios will be further enhancing the entrances to the galleries by making and installing three new ash framed doors to match the external doors he made for The Ropewalk four years ago.

“Until now we have been able to increase the number of artists whose work we display and sell just because we didn’t have the space.  But the Arts Council grant means that we can soon rectify that,” said Richard.

And a spin-off of the relocation of the various facilities means that there is now the opportunity to enlarge the kitchen serving the coffee shop at the same time.

“We appreciate that our visitors may experience some disruption for a short space of time but we hope they bear with us as we try to make our facilities even more user-friendly,” added Richard.

The first opportunity members of the public will have to view the print studio and the other alterations will be during the Insight 2010 Open Studios weekends on September 18 and 19 and September 23 and 24.

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By richardhatfield |

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Sarah Lock

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By richardhatfield |