2010 Exhibition to help pay funding for Master’s Degree

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A forthcoming solo exhibition by Barton upon Humber based artist Ellie Collins could be the key to her studying for a Master of Arts in Fine Art a prestigious London art college.

Ellie is hoping that sales from the exhibition, Slipped Halo, will secure the £5,000 funding she needs to take up her place in September 2010 at Camberwell College of Art.

The forthcoming solo exhibition at Ropewalk Contemporary Art & Craft in Maltkiln Road, will see the introduction of a series of new works inspired by the artist’s own fictional writing.

The short story in question, entitled Slipped Halo was selected last year for an anthology called Fathom 08, published by Fathom Press (ISBN 978-0-9555950-2-8). The story examines a snapshot of events that form 45 minutes of an unremarkable day from the perspective of a nine year old boy with autism.

The paintings in oils on canvas utilise textile processes to overlay and intervene drawn elements within the works, suggesting a sensory interpretation of events within the story.

This exhibition in the Artspace gallery is Ellie’s first major show since a solo exhibition of her works on paper was previewed at Kuntur Gallery, Amsterdam in March 2008, and is expected to feature around 30 new works.

It opens on Saturday, January 16 and continues until Sunday, March 21.

“I’m well on my way to completing the final few pieces,” said Ellie.

“Due to the narrative strand of this work and the abstract nature of the imagery, I have introduced some key objects of reference which will facilitate a visual interpretation of the story which inspired the paintings on canvas,” she continued.

“Despite a fruitful career, which has included opportunities to perform and exhibit throughout the UK and internationally, the aspiration to study for an MA in Fine Art in order to further my professional development has never been far from my mind, “ Ellie explained.

Since graduating from the University of Wolverhampton in 1997, Ellie has continued her career development with repeated support from Arts Council England and during the past five years has enjoyed increased exposure with exhibitions, apart from Amsterdam, two in Edinburgh, six in the United States and also in Macedonia and Brazil.

In addition to her studio practice at The Ropewalk, Ellie works as Education Officer at Ropewalk Contemporary Art & Craft, the regionally acclaimed centre for the visual arts.

“My employers support me in my ambition and have kindly agreed to hold my position open while I take one year out to complete the course but the chance to take up the place is still dependant on me securing my own funding,” said Ellie.

Fathom 08 is available to purchase for £4.00. It is stocked at Ropewalk Contemporary Art & Craft, Barton upon Humber. For more information or to request a copy please email info@the-ropewalk.co.uk

For more information about Ellie’s work visit www.elliecollins.com or email her on e@elliecollins.com or call 01652 660380 or  07784631060

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