Delightful Start to 2010 Ropewalk Workshops

By admin |

The 2010 programme of workshops at Ropewalk Contemporary Art & Craft in Barton upon Humber gets off to a crafty start with tutor Linda Westerman on Saturday, January 9.

“Bags of Delight” will see students spending the day producing a small decorative bag worked in hand embroidery.

“The embroidery will be carried out using a mixture of unusual threads and fabrics,” explained The Ropewalk’s Education Officer, Ellie Collins.

Ellie went on to say that machine embroidery can be incorporated into the bag but a sewing machine was not essential.

“Students need to bring along needles, a mixture of embroidery threads as well as any unusual threads and scraps of fabrics and beads if these are available,” she went on. “Further bits and pieces will be supplied by Linda to dip into throughout the workshop.”

The cost of the workshop, which runs from 10.30am until 4.30pm, is £30 or £27 for Ropewalk members and there will be an additional charge of £1.50 for a small pack of items needed to make the bag which will include painted canvas, string and beads.

For more details or to book a place on the workshop please contact 01652 660380.

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